Archive for the ‘Federalism’ Category

You Didn’t See That Trump Voter Coming.

November 15, 2016

This place has changed for good
Your economic theory said it would
It’s hard for us to understand
We can’t give up our jobs the way we should

“We Work the Black Seam” – Sting

__________

You didn’t see him. He blindsided you. You didn’t catch a glimpse of him out of the corner of your eye. You couldn’t feel his presence every time you traveled past the shadowlands of the Rust Belt, or through those rural counties you had to tolerate while you drove to some place where the sun still shines. You couldn’t hear his heavy breathing, seething at the realities that were descending upon his disintegrating existence.

You didn’t notice that Trump voter, that 50-year-old former tool-and-die maker with 25 years of experience.

That 50-something tool-and-die maker knows how to cut metal to a thousandth of an inch, knows how to set up a job blindfolded. His job was taken over by some kid who is the victim of a dysfunctional education system, willing to take half the salary; little matter his inexperience cut productivity of the position in half.

Or more likely, that tool-and-die maker saw his job shipped overseas, all in the name of free trade and globalization. The tool-and-die makers in Southeast Asia work for a fifth of what that American tool-and-die maker earned. Why should that American keep his job, unless he’s willing to accept a fifth of what he made last year?

You were hoping that tool-and-die maker would simply drop into a deep crevice somewhere, and he was supposed to accept life in that crevice, because that was the way of “free trade,” of “globalization.”

In fact, “free trade” has little to do with the trade of goods, and more to do with American corporations finding overseas sources of the lowest-cost labor. But the tool-and-die maker hears the phrase “free trade,” and his hatred of this misnomer grows, exponentially.

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Boston Marathon Bombing Turning Ripe… and Stinking

May 23, 2013

In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing, I was stunned by the extremely heavy-handed approach federal authorities took towards an already injured 19 year old, hunched over in the bottom of a boat preparing to die. Three stun grenades and a hail of bullets were launched at this kid discovered by the boat owner, an owner who had calmly peered under the boat’s canvas, found the suspect, then turned his back and walked towards his house to notify authorities without so much as a verbal threat from the suspect.

Now we get a story of another suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing who was interrogated at his home, then shot during the proceedings. How in the hell does something like that happen? The whole purpose of having additional personnel in place during an interrogation is to ensure the suspect can be restrained should he launch himself against the interrogator. And wasn’t the suspect frisked prior to the interrogation? This, of course, assumes any validity of the story that the suspect had possession of a knife, a detail that is now being backpedaled out of the story.

At best, this is extremely sloppy police work. The argument can certainly be made that law enforcement was hopped up on their own adrenaline.

At worst, there is a possibility that outright lies are being made by law enforcement about the interrogation, wherein the suspect may have revealed damning evidence against authorities regarding the bombing, and the suspect was silenced before the truth could emerge.

This Boston Marathon bombing case is beginning to smell like rotting roadkill, surrounded by the thick of summer heat.

Two Explosions – One an Obsession, the Corporate-Induced One Ignored

April 22, 2013

I hold no sympathy for the Boston Marathon bombers who killed three people and permanently disabled at least a dozen others, but the bombing’s aftermath became surreal.

Far too many people, probably most not even residing in the Boston area, took to social media to disseminate rumors and make unfounded conjectures. Bloomberg News posted a link to provide “live” coverage of the manhunt surrounding the search for the second suspect, as if the manhunt became a sporting event in its own right (no doubt capturing a far higher viewership than the marathon itself could ever dream). And Boston went on an area-wide, quasi-hysterical lock-down, although it was very evident that the suspects’ actions in the bombing’s aftermath showed them to be amateurs, not professionals. Ironically a man, who ignored the police request to stay indoors, found the second suspect hiding out in his boat, not the authorities.

For some reason, while writing this post I remembered that plane crash scene with Ezra Stiles (Edward Herrmann) at the stick, from the movie The Great Waldo Pepper.

Meanwhile…

…an explosion at a fertilizer factory in West, Texas killed 12 people to date, wounded 200 others, and 60 for which remain unaccounted. And we learn that

“The Texas plant that was the scene of a deadly explosion this week was last inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1985.” (emphasis added)

 

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The Quiet Constitutional Crisis Behind the 2nd Amendment

April 9, 2013

The following post discusses the original intent behind the Second Amendment. Readers should hold their assumptions, read carefully, and check their conclusion jumping until the end.

Introduction

The rhetoric over gun control legislation is heating up, yet from no corner of the political spectrum do we hear discussed the underlying constitutional crisis that precipitated this ongoing debate, one that America has lived with for over a century. Unfortunately, the accusations and aspersions thrown from either side towards the other generates more heat than light, and it is nigh time to investigate the original intent of the Second Amendment. Although many alleged constitutional authorities have waxed obliquely on the reasons behind the insertion of this amendment, James Madison left little doubt as to why the arming of citizens was a critical civil liberty. His reasoning can be found in The Federalist No. 46.

I find, however, that far too many Americans do not understand the intent of the Bill of Rights, much less the intent of the Second Amendment, and so it is here I must begin. I suspect this reality arises more from the degraded state of our high-school education in civics than from anything else. For those who are comfortable with their understanding of the Bill of Rights, you can safely skip to the next section. (more…)


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