Archive for the ‘labor’ Category

You Didn’t See That Trump Voter Coming.

November 15, 2016

This place has changed for good
Your economic theory said it would
It’s hard for us to understand
We can’t give up our jobs the way we should

“We Work the Black Seam” – Sting

__________

You didn’t see him. He blindsided you. You didn’t catch a glimpse of him out of the corner of your eye. You couldn’t feel his presence every time you traveled past the shadowlands of the Rust Belt, or through those rural counties you had to tolerate while you drove to some place where the sun still shines. You couldn’t hear his heavy breathing, seething at the realities that were descending upon his disintegrating existence.

You didn’t notice that Trump voter, that 50-year-old former tool-and-die maker with 25 years of experience.

That 50-something tool-and-die maker knows how to cut metal to a thousandth of an inch, knows how to set up a job blindfolded. His job was taken over by some kid who is the victim of a dysfunctional education system, willing to take half the salary; little matter his inexperience cut productivity of the position in half.

Or more likely, that tool-and-die maker saw his job shipped overseas, all in the name of free trade and globalization. The tool-and-die makers in Southeast Asia work for a fifth of what that American tool-and-die maker earned. Why should that American keep his job, unless he’s willing to accept a fifth of what he made last year?

You were hoping that tool-and-die maker would simply drop into a deep crevice somewhere, and he was supposed to accept life in that crevice, because that was the way of “free trade,” of “globalization.”

In fact, “free trade” has little to do with the trade of goods, and more to do with American corporations finding overseas sources of the lowest-cost labor. But the tool-and-die maker hears the phrase “free trade,” and his hatred of this misnomer grows, exponentially.

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The Economic Metaphors of ‘All is Lost’

March 6, 2014

Now that the hub-bub of the Oscars is over, it’s an appropriate time to examine the metaphor-laden film, All is Lost. It was nominated for an Academy Award in sound editing (but ultimately taken by Gravity), but received little attention during Oscar season. I believe the economic metaphors were recognized by the elites, and they weren’t very interested in promoting All is Lost any more than necessary.

I must provide a spoiler alert, although the film is one of those “have-to-see-it” experiences. Having read summaries before seeing All is Lost, I held some trepidation about the film, wondering if a single cast member with a dialogue-less script (there is a short voice-over at the beginning) could really pull it off.

It works. As I said, you have to see it for yourself to believe such a sparse premise can keep your attention.

However, I do not plan to undertake a scene-by-scene analysis here. The broader strokes are discussed. I’ll leave it to the viewer to fill in the gaps. And forgive me if some of the descriptions show my lack of understanding the nomenclature. Having hailed from the Midwest doesn’t lend itself to a very full education of maritime knowledge.

The economic overtures are already at a start when we learn All is Lost was written and directed by J.C. Chandor, who garnered an Academy Award nomination for best original screenplay for Margin Call, an excellent film on Wall Street’s role in the Global Financial Crisis.

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The Focus is on Cheap Labor, Not Immigration

May 1, 2013

Today is May Day, a universal recognition of labor everywhere save the U.S.: We have  “Labor Day” in September, which serves as a proxy for the end of summer. Thus, Labor Day is a bit of a downer, even if the weather doesn’t start to change towards fall for another month.

May Day, however, has always been tinged with workers’ movements, socialism, communism, etc., etc., so its always been viewed as a little unseemly, hence the U.S. had to create its own day for labor recognition.

Nevertheless, labor is a hot-button issue these days in the U.S., so May Day seems to be a good day to post on labor issues.

Wait. What labor issues? Who’s talking about labor issues?

Well, if truth be told, the entire immigration reform battle, er, discussion, revolves around the labor issue, not the immigration issue. More specifically, cheap labor, and more specifically than that, cheap skilled labor. (more…)


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