Posts Tagged ‘free trade’

You Didn’t See That Trump Voter Coming.

November 15, 2016

This place has changed for good
Your economic theory said it would
It’s hard for us to understand
We can’t give up our jobs the way we should

“We Work the Black Seam” – Sting

__________

You didn’t see him. He blindsided you. You didn’t catch a glimpse of him out of the corner of your eye. You couldn’t feel his presence every time you traveled past the shadowlands of the Rust Belt, or through those rural counties you had to tolerate while you drove to some place where the sun still shines. You couldn’t hear his heavy breathing, seething at the realities that were descending upon his disintegrating existence.

You didn’t notice that Trump voter, that 50-year-old former tool-and-die maker with 25 years of experience.

That 50-something tool-and-die maker knows how to cut metal to a thousandth of an inch, knows how to set up a job blindfolded. His job was taken over by some kid who is the victim of a dysfunctional education system, willing to take half the salary; little matter his inexperience cut productivity of the position in half.

Or more likely, that tool-and-die maker saw his job shipped overseas, all in the name of free trade and globalization. The tool-and-die makers in Southeast Asia work for a fifth of what that American tool-and-die maker earned. Why should that American keep his job, unless he’s willing to accept a fifth of what he made last year?

You were hoping that tool-and-die maker would simply drop into a deep crevice somewhere, and he was supposed to accept life in that crevice, because that was the way of “free trade,” of “globalization.”

In fact, “free trade” has little to do with the trade of goods, and more to do with American corporations finding overseas sources of the lowest-cost labor. But the tool-and-die maker hears the phrase “free trade,” and his hatred of this misnomer grows, exponentially.

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Globalization’s Mausoleums: The Former Factories of the Rust Belt

April 8, 2015

At any street corner the feeling of absurdity can strike any man in the face. – Albert Camus

 

 

The story that follows isn’t unique to this Rust Belt city.

It has occurred, over and over, across the Rust Belt – across the U.S. – for the past 35 years.

What’s amazing is it is still unfolding.

What’s even more amazing is how complacent everyone has remained.

About the loss of jobs.

About the weak or non-existent development efforts for local economies.

About how the U.S. will sink into serfdom, not by the threats of socialism (as Hayek suggested)…

…but by the reality of our apathy, our denial, or our ignorance.

I simply wanted to commit this story to writing, as a way to preserve it, in case anyone ever asks, “What happened?”

That is, if there is anyone left who cares enough in the future to ask.

No one is asking now. [1]

Globalization’s Mausoleums

The spirits of past General Electric workers reside here.

Bldg Demolition

This is one of the buildings currently under demolition at General Electric’s Broadway campus in Fort Wayne, Indiana. To the right is an opening where another GE building, of similar size, once stood.

Last year, GE closed down a testing lab, the last operation of any kind on the campus. It employed some 28 people at the end.

At its height, General Electric employed over 10,000 employees in Fort Wayne; almost all were well-paying jobs.

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